Sedating house cats for travel

05-Jun-2017 01:47

There are tons of instances where pets have been frightened while traveling and end up getting away from their owners. To further keep your furry friend safe and able to find his/her way home, proper identification is key. Feed your pet once a day (preferably during the evening and establish a feeding routine). Traveling is stressful and they need time to relax and play.

In the case of such a heartbreaking event, having them microchipped will at least give them a good chance of being returned to you. Have your cat wear a collar with your name, destination, phone number, and rabies tag. Secure carrier in a safe spot and preferably where he can see you. Keep the windows up (the open window noise and wind can be unsettling to kitty).

Diazepam, another commonly used drug, often wears off quickly and can be toxic to the liver in some cats.I have found that many cats become disoriented and somewhat more anxious when sedatives start wearing off, which is clearly not the intended effect.Diphenhydramine, a common, over-the-counter antihistamine, can be used at 2.2 mg/kg (1 mg/lb) every eight hours for sedation.Depending on the brand, they may be given orally, applied directly to the cat, or sprayed in the carrier and car.If your cat's travel anxiety is severe and doesn't respond to the combination of behavior modification techniques and holistic remedies, talk to your veterinarian about prescription medications. Shafford of Vet Anesthesia Specialists recommends the following medications for travel anxiety and other stressors.

Diazepam, another commonly used drug, often wears off quickly and can be toxic to the liver in some cats.

I have found that many cats become disoriented and somewhat more anxious when sedatives start wearing off, which is clearly not the intended effect.

Diphenhydramine, a common, over-the-counter antihistamine, can be used at 2.2 mg/kg (1 mg/lb) every eight hours for sedation.

Depending on the brand, they may be given orally, applied directly to the cat, or sprayed in the carrier and car.

If your cat's travel anxiety is severe and doesn't respond to the combination of behavior modification techniques and holistic remedies, talk to your veterinarian about prescription medications. Shafford of Vet Anesthesia Specialists recommends the following medications for travel anxiety and other stressors.

In the next few months we will be our first cross-country driveā€¦ Last time we drove across the country, from Arizona to Virginia, we didn't have to worry about keeping another living, breathing thing alive and happy.