Phelps and schmidt dating

03-Jun-2017 16:07

WASHINGTON — Allison Schmitt hates public speaking. I can speak from the heart and I really want to spread the word that it’s OK not to be OK.

But the Olympic swimmer shared her story of battling depression in a packed auditorium Thursday night as part of National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day.“I get sweaty hands; I feel like I’m going to throw up. I want to spread the message that it’s OK to ask for help.”Schmitt and Michael Phelps, the most decorated Olympian of all time with 28 medals, were chairpersons of the event, which was hosted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) at George Washington University.

Terrill / AP) Michael Phelps frequently refers to Allison Schmitt as his sister from another mother.

For the last year, they've shared a roof in Arizona, and Schmitt has become "Aunt Schmitty" to her friend's firstborn.

Phelps' journey from the last Olympics — falling out of love with the sport, hitting an emotional bottom, rebounding to enjoy fatherhood and a reinvigorated training schedule — has been well documented. The five-time Olympic medalist fell into a depression so deep that she sometimes slept away her days rather than face a world that expected the old bubbly Schmitty.

In total, Schmitt has won seventeen medals in major international competitions: eleven gold, five silver, and two bronze spanning the Summer Olympics, the FINA World Championships, the Pan Pacific Championships, and the Pan American Games.

She was a four-time National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) national champion in the 200- and 500-yard freestyle swimming events during college, and was a member of the Georgia Bulldogs team that won the NCAA Division I Women's team title in 2013.

Removing the stigma of talking about mental health is important, Schmitt says.“Mental illness is something you deal with every day, just because you go to a psychologist, just because you’re feeling better one day doesn’t mean it’s gone; doesn’t mean you’re healed,” she said.

Michael Phelps and Allison Schmitt are in the best of moods.

Phelps' journey from the last Olympics — falling out of love with the sport, hitting an emotional bottom, rebounding to enjoy fatherhood and a reinvigorated training schedule — has been well documented. The five-time Olympic medalist fell into a depression so deep that she sometimes slept away her days rather than face a world that expected the old bubbly Schmitty.

In total, Schmitt has won seventeen medals in major international competitions: eleven gold, five silver, and two bronze spanning the Summer Olympics, the FINA World Championships, the Pan Pacific Championships, and the Pan American Games.

She was a four-time National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) national champion in the 200- and 500-yard freestyle swimming events during college, and was a member of the Georgia Bulldogs team that won the NCAA Division I Women's team title in 2013.

Removing the stigma of talking about mental health is important, Schmitt says.“Mental illness is something you deal with every day, just because you go to a psychologist, just because you’re feeling better one day doesn’t mean it’s gone; doesn’t mean you’re healed,” she said.

Michael Phelps and Allison Schmitt are in the best of moods.

MORE OLYMPIC COVERAGE: She has undergone therapy with a psychologist and has become an advocate for mental health issues.