Ehs legislation updating service

18-Oct-2016 15:20

Brower, Siddhartha Mandal, Shivdeep Hayer, Mandeep Sran, Asima Zehra, Sunny J. Patel, Ravneet Kaur, Leena Chatterjee, Savita Mishra, B. These minerals are essential in the manufacture of a variety of devices, including consumer electronics such as mobile phones, laptops, and MP3 players.The extraction and sale of blood diamonds, also known as "conflict diamonds", is a better-known phenomenon which occurs under virtually identical conditions.In addition there are several challenges related to for example legislation, standardization, infrastructure investments, privacy and security.

International efforts to reduce trade in conflict resources, tried to reduce incentives to extract and fight over them.On July 14, 2017, Mass Health promulgated 101 CMR 350.00: Home Health Services, which increased the reimbursement rates for the following codes: Code: G0299Rate: .21Unit: Per Visit Service: Services of an RN in home health setting (one through 30 calendar days)Code: G0300Rate: .21Unit: Per Visit Service: Services of an LPN in home health setting (one through 30 calendar days)Currently, Mass Health is experiencing IT issues and providers who submitted claims for services provided on or after July, 14, 2017 are being reimbursed at their previous rate.All claims submitted with the correct modifiers are not affected, and are being reimbursed at the correct rate.The concept of 'conflict resource', or 'conflict commodity' emerged in the late 1990s, initially in relation to the 'conflict diamonds' that were financing rebellions in Angola and Sierra Leone.(The media often called these 'blood diamonds'.) Global Witness has called for an international standardized definition to facilitate a more systematic application of UN resolutions, the prevention of complicity in abuses during hostilities by commercial entities exploiting or trading in conflict resources, and the prosecution of war profiteers suspected of supporting or abetting war criminals.[2]" ...natural resources whose systematic exploitation and trade in a context of conflict contribute to, benefit from or result in the commission of serious violations of human rights, violations of international humanitarian law or violations amounting to crimes under international law.

International efforts to reduce trade in conflict resources, tried to reduce incentives to extract and fight over them.

On July 14, 2017, Mass Health promulgated 101 CMR 350.00: Home Health Services, which increased the reimbursement rates for the following codes: Code: G0299Rate: .21Unit: Per Visit Service: Services of an RN in home health setting (one through 30 calendar days)Code: G0300Rate: .21Unit: Per Visit Service: Services of an LPN in home health setting (one through 30 calendar days)Currently, Mass Health is experiencing IT issues and providers who submitted claims for services provided on or after July, 14, 2017 are being reimbursed at their previous rate.

All claims submitted with the correct modifiers are not affected, and are being reimbursed at the correct rate.

The concept of 'conflict resource', or 'conflict commodity' emerged in the late 1990s, initially in relation to the 'conflict diamonds' that were financing rebellions in Angola and Sierra Leone.

(The media often called these 'blood diamonds'.) Global Witness has called for an international standardized definition to facilitate a more systematic application of UN resolutions, the prevention of complicity in abuses during hostilities by commercial entities exploiting or trading in conflict resources, and the prosecution of war profiteers suspected of supporting or abetting war criminals.[2]" ...natural resources whose systematic exploitation and trade in a context of conflict contribute to, benefit from or result in the commission of serious violations of human rights, violations of international humanitarian law or violations amounting to crimes under international law.

For example, in the United States, the 2010 Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act required manufacturers to audit their supply chains and report use of conflict minerals.