Dating my vintage desk

18-Mar-2017 09:47

There is a lot of controversy over why there were two lots of numbers.

The most likely answer is that the larger number was the total number of machines produced by Singers when they only had a few factories and could keep up with and control the production output from Britain and America.

Model 90 (1973)​- The base continued to have a small footprint, with a steel cover.- The fork uses a bent steel strip and is held in place at the pivot point by a nut and bolt.- Springs are without metal caps.- Linkage strip is nylon.- The back arm has a small nylon section at the top to fit into the centre joint.- Side arms will have been made of a steel metal strip.- The swivel joint at the top has a nylon section in the middle.- The fluted shade has a push button switch at the top.

Apex 90 (1985)​- Has a relatively low profile base with a bigger footprint and a steel cover.- The fork is offset and is made from a bent metal strip.- Springs were often painted black.- At the junction between the fork and the side arms a plastic adjuster wheel was used on each side.- The tube has quite a large, square profile, and is slotted into the different plastic jointing components.- Centre joint encloses the cable, and is held in place by a screw.- The fluted shade was painted white inside.- Push button switch on the top of the shade is held in place by a smooth metal nut.

Around 1810 he had produced his first globe, and by 1818 he and his sons had established an "artificial globe manufactory" in Albany, New York, where they produced globes of three-inch, nine-inch, and thirteen-inch diameters.

In 1827 he brought his globes down to Washington, D. On his business card he wrote that he was "now exhibiting for public inspection at the United States Library of Congress" a pair of thirteen-inch globes, and claimed he was "the original manufacturer of Globes in this country, and has brought the art to such a degree of perfection, as to supersede altogether the necessity of importation of that article from abroad."The two smaller globes shown here are an undated pair of three-inch terrestrial and celestial globes probably published in the 1820s.

Photo Credit: Etsy The school desk pictured above is representative of a new generation of school desks that featured individual cubbyholes, which allowed students to stash their belongings.

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He has written extensively for trade magazines, radio, television, books and publications world wide.Advertising for the desk claimed, “No desk in the market is made with more care, nor of better materials than the ‘Fashion,’ and none has met with a more popular reception, or gives better satisfaction.” The desk featured a Patent T-head, which eliminated screws and bolts by joining the wood of the top, back, and seat to the legs, which were made of cast iron.Photo Credit: Art of Manliness Although standing desks are currently hailed as an ergonomically friendly alternative to the traditional desk and chair, its use in the classroom can be traced back to 1899, when Dr.After seeing a pair of terrestrial and celestial globes at Dartmouth College, he decided to make his own.He set about learning geography from an encyclopedia he purchased for the purpose and learned engraving from an experienced engraver of maps.

He has written extensively for trade magazines, radio, television, books and publications world wide.

Advertising for the desk claimed, “No desk in the market is made with more care, nor of better materials than the ‘Fashion,’ and none has met with a more popular reception, or gives better satisfaction.” The desk featured a Patent T-head, which eliminated screws and bolts by joining the wood of the top, back, and seat to the legs, which were made of cast iron.

Photo Credit: Art of Manliness Although standing desks are currently hailed as an ergonomically friendly alternative to the traditional desk and chair, its use in the classroom can be traced back to 1899, when Dr.

After seeing a pair of terrestrial and celestial globes at Dartmouth College, he decided to make his own.

He set about learning geography from an encyclopedia he purchased for the purpose and learned engraving from an experienced engraver of maps.

Model 1227 (1935) - Features a solid three tiered base that was painted.- The fork is separated into different components and the centre block was often chrome plated.- The fork block says ‘The Anglepoise – Made by Herbert Terry & Sons’ on the front- There is an earthing point on the back of the fork block.- Two spring bars were used, the one for the centre spring being higher.