At bamyan in afghanistan predating european

09-Jan-2017 07:38

- but hay-e bamiyan) were two 6th century monumental statues of standing buddhas carved into the side of a cliff in the Bamyan valley in the Hazarajat region of central Afghanistan, situated 230 km (143 miles) northwest of Kabul at an altitude of 2500 meters (8,202 ft).Built in 507, the larger in 554, the statues represented the classic blended style of Gandhara art.The lower parts of the statues’ arms were constructed from the same mud-straw mix while supported on wooden armatures.They were intentionally dynamited and destroyed in 2001 by the Taliban, on orders from leader Mullah Mohammed Omar, after the Taliban government declared that they were “idols” (which are forbidden under Sharia law).Japan and Switzerland, among others, have pledged support for the rebuilding of the statues., Bamyan was part of the Indian kingdom of Gandhara.It was the site of several Buddhist and Hindu monasteries, and a thriving center for religion, philosophy, and Indo-Greek art.During the subsequent search for a colossal reclining Buddha—also reported by Xuanzang and thought to be some 980 feet (300 metres) long—in 2008 an additional Buddha was discovered nearby.

The two Buddha figures, together with numerous ancient man-made caves in the cliffs north of the town, made Bamiyan a major regime had the statues destroyed, despite worldwide pleas to save them.

The main bodies were hewn directly from the sandstone cliffs, but details were modeled in mud mixed with straw, coated with stucco.

- but hay-e bamiyaan) were two monumental statues of standing Buddhas carved into the side of a cliff in the Bamyan valley in the Hazarajat region of central Afghanistan, situated 230 km (143 miles) northwest of Kabul at an altitude of 2500 meters (8,202 ft).

The binder was used to dry paint and help it adhere to rocky surfaces.

The muralsand the remains of two giant, destroyed Buddhasinclude the world's oldest known oil-based paint, predating European uses of the substance by at least a hundred years, scientists announced late last month.

The two Buddha figures, together with numerous ancient man-made caves in the cliffs north of the town, made Bamiyan a major regime had the statues destroyed, despite worldwide pleas to save them.The main bodies were hewn directly from the sandstone cliffs, but details were modeled in mud mixed with straw, coated with stucco.- but hay-e bamiyaan) were two monumental statues of standing Buddhas carved into the side of a cliff in the Bamyan valley in the Hazarajat region of central Afghanistan, situated 230 km (143 miles) northwest of Kabul at an altitude of 2500 meters (8,202 ft).The binder was used to dry paint and help it adhere to rocky surfaces.The muralsand the remains of two giant, destroyed Buddhasinclude the world's oldest known oil-based paint, predating European uses of the substance by at least a hundred years, scientists announced late last month.were created there in the 4th and 5th centuries; the larger was 175 feet (53 metres) high, and the smaller was 120 feet (about 40 metres).