Antarctic radioactive dating of meteorites

18-Dec-2016 23:10

Meteoroids which is what the rock is called when it is still in space are cold.During their passage through the atmosphere they heat and melt on the outside but the time is so short that they are burning the insides of the stones remains cold.He was employed at Caltech's Division of Geological & Planetary Sciences at the time of writing the first edition.He is presently employed in the Space & Atmospheric Sciences Group at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.All rocks and minerals contain long-lived radioactive elements that were incorporated into Earth when the Solar System formed.These radioactive elements constitute independent clocks that allow geologists to determine the age of the rocks in which they occur.Potential uses, Buizert and his colleagues say, are dating meteorites recovered in Antarctic ice, and studying the Earth's climate and its cycle of ice ages.Krypton is a noble gas that is present in the atmosphere at extremely low levels, or about one part per million.

His Ph D thesis was on isotope ratios in meteorites, including surface exposure dating.

Because there's so little krypton in the air, you have to melt down a lot of ice to obtain sufficient samples.

Also, you need a device that can count, or trap, individual atoms.

Radiometric dating--the process of determining the age of rocks from the decay of their radioactive elements--has been in widespread use for over half a century.

There are over forty such techniques, each using a different radioactive element or a different way of measuring them.

His Ph D thesis was on isotope ratios in meteorites, including surface exposure dating.

Because there's so little krypton in the air, you have to melt down a lot of ice to obtain sufficient samples.

Also, you need a device that can count, or trap, individual atoms.

Radiometric dating--the process of determining the age of rocks from the decay of their radioactive elements--has been in widespread use for over half a century.

There are over forty such techniques, each using a different radioactive element or a different way of measuring them.

By comparing the radioisotope's state of decay to stable krypton isotopes, researchers can determine how long the gas has been trapped in the ice.